Elemental Analysis Testing: Add it to Your Engine Coolant Report

Is Elemental Analysis Testing Included in Your Engine Coolant Report?

Do you get a physical every year? How about a routine blood test? Elemental Analysis is similar to having your blood drawn for a yearly physical. Just as the bloodwork will provide more details to your physician on how your body is functioning, the elemental analysis testing will provide more details on the equipment’s overall system health. If elemental analysis testing isn’t included in your routine fluid analysis, information regarding corrosion/wear, contamination and certain fluid properties will not be able to be monitored. Cooling system concerns are a leading factor to how well the equipment effectively can perform. Adding elemental analysis testing will identify corrosion, mechanical issues, contamination and other possible fluid properties in the sample.

With majority of engine failures traced back to cooling system, predominantly due to overheating events, proper coolant analysis testing should be performed on all samples. When proper testing is not included, the missing information will hinder the laboratory’s maintenance recommendations as the possible root cause for concerns may not be identified. Ultimately, not identifying the root cause will lead to higher downtimes and engine failures.

How to Add Elemental Analysis

Reach out today to review if your fluid analysis program includes the proper testing that will best benefit your program. Including elemental analysis testing within your program will help identify if concerns are present in the cooling system. When specific issues are identified correction can be performed to reduce further potential damage to the equipment. Elemental analysis testing should be included on all samples submitted to the laboratory as this testing will provide critical information regarding the equipment’s overall system health. Catching early system concerns and performing proper corrections will assist with maintaining proper cooling system function reducing unexpected downtimes and engine failures.

Check out our Technical Bulletin to find out more information on the Benefits of Elemental Analysis Testing on Engine Coolants. 

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Published October 8, 2020

Do You Have the Right Coolant Testing?

Providing a Greater Understanding

Do you have an extended life coolant? Did you know that mechanical and/or contamination can occur causing the extended life coolant properties to decrease and reduce the life of the fluid? Have you ever had an unknown coolant formulation in the cooling system and a coolant top off was needed? Including High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) testing to your program will provide the additional information to assist with providing a greater understanding of your fluid properties. When HPLC testing is included in your coolant test package, additional coolant inhibitors that may be in the coolant formulation will be monitored. Results for the inhibitors will be reported in parts per million.

What is High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) Testing?

HPLC testing will report two different inhibitor types:

  1. Carboxylic organic acids
    • These acids will be utilized in extended life coolant formulations and hybrid formulations. The inhibitors will provide corrosion protection of the metals in the cooling system. The corrosion protection inhibitors needed for your application and formulation must be maintained and adequate to protect your cooling system.
    • There are a lot of different organic acids that may be used in the coolant formulation. Understanding the coolant formulation is a key factor in maintaining the coolant appropriately.
    • Carboxylic organic acids our method reports:
      • Benzoic Acid
      • Sebacic Acid
      • 2-Ethylhexanoic Acid
      • Octanoic Acid
      • P-Toluic Acid
      • Adipic Acid
      • 4-Tert-Butylbenzoic Acid
  2. Azoles
    • Azoles may be utilized in any coolant formulation on the market. Azole inhibitors are for copper and brass protection in the coolant formulation.
    • Azoles our method reports:
      • Benzotriazole (BZT)
      • Tolytriazole (TTZ)
      • Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT)

HPLC Compared To Test Strip

HPLC testing will provide more insight of the type of inhibitors in the coolant formulation compared to a pass/fail carboxylic acid test strip. Test strips are subjective as a color determination is usually the indicator for the result. Test strips will only work for certain coolant formulations determined by what the test strip is looking for. Whereas HPLC testing can be performed on any coolant formulation and report each of the organic acids and azoles the method is able to report in ppm. The HPLC testing will indicate concerns of mixing coolant formulations when compared to a baseline. HPLC testing will also help determine if carboxylic organic acids and azoles are utilized in the coolant formulation or not. A test strip will not be able to provide this information and may or may not be applicable for the coolant formulation providing an inaccurate result making more difficult to maintain your fluid appropriately.

Reach out today! Add High Pressure Liquid Chromatography testing to your program.

Including HPLC testing to your program will provide testing to determine if organic acids and azole inhibitors, utilized in some coolant formulations, are being maintained for proper protection.
HPLC testing will provide more insight on how to maintain the coolant formulation and will determine if concerns are present impacting your corrosion protection inhibitors. Catching concerns early and making corrections will lower corrosion concerns and even possible cooling system issues that could have led to engine problems.

Check out our Technical Bulletin to find out more information on how High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) Testing works:

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Published September 8, 2020

Ion Chromatography Testing Can Catch Cooling System Concerns Early

Have you received a recurring action on your coolant analysis report? Are you noticing recurring concerns with your pH, corrosion metals, and/or inhibitor depleting rapidly? Have you ever topped off the system with water only?

With basic coolant testing a piece of the puzzle to help identify the root cause of the concern in the cooling system may be missing. Basic testing will identify concerns and provide recommendations however, there may still be more going on in the system that basic testing will not identify.

Why Should Advanced Ion Chromatography (IC) Coolant Testing Be Added?

The advanced Ion Chromatography (IC) testing will determine glycol degradation, contamination and coolant inhibitors of nitrate, nitrite and possibly phosphate. IC testing will provide additional valuable information regarding your cooling system health.

IC testing will help find concerns with:

  • Hot spots (plugging of the system)
  • Combustion gas leaks
  • Electrical ground issues
  • Contamination concerns

Each concern above will cause a chemical reaction within the cooling system, resulting in failure overtime. Approximately 40% of engine failures can be traced back to a concern in the cooling system. Including IC testing to your routine coolant analysis program will provide more information on what is going on in the cooling system. Concerns can be caught early allowing for scheduled down time and less engine failures due to the cooling system.

What are Glycol Degradation Acids?

Degradation acids will form when ethylene or propylene glycol chemically breakdown. When degradation acids are present further glycol breakdown will occur as the acids present will act similar to a catalyst causing further glycol degradation over time.

Causes for degradation acids:

  • Localized overheating
  • Restriction of coolant circulation
  • Low coolant pressure
  • Mechanical concerns
  • Age of fluid

Degradation acids will hinder the coolant properties over time and may result in a decrease of the coolants ability to protect the metals in the system. Identifying the root cause is key to maintain the fluid and equipment. 

What Contamination Concerns can be Found?

Ion Chromatography will indicate contamination of chloride and sulfate. Chloride and sulfate are a concern if present in the system. Chloride can form hydrochloric acid, decarbonizes iron and is extremely corrosive. Sulfate can form sulfuric acid and combined with calcium to form scale in the system.

Causes for contamination:

  • Water source not meeting specification
  • Combustion gases
  • Air leak
  • Flush water left in system

Sulfate, when trending with prior history, can find an early combustion gas leak concern in the cooling system before an action is indicated on your lubricant analysis report. The coolant analysis will actually catch the concern and action can be made before a significant amount of coolant can mix with the lubricant leading to further engine wear.

Chloride contamination could be due to a venting concern allowing outside air to enter the system. Both chloride and sulfate can be present in a water that does not meet specification. Just a quick top off with water can cause a failure over time.

Catching contamination early with Ion Chromatography testing will provide the proper actions needed to correct the source of contamination before corrosion and/or chemical reactions occur harming the metals in the engine.

Are there benefits of reporting Nitrite and Nitrate?

Nitrite and nitrate may or may not be part of the coolant formulation as a corrosion inhibitor. The Ion Chromatography method is a more accurate method to determine nitrite concentration. The inhibitor if present, should be maintained for proper corrosion protection. Results can find concerns of low inhibitor, or mixing if inhibitor levels are not consistent with a new fluid reference. Trending both inhibitor levels can detect early concerns of chemical reactions, such as an electrical ground issue where nitrite could convert to nitrate.

Reach out today! Add Ion Chromatography testing to your program.

Advanced coolant testing will provide more details of possible chemical reactions occurring in your equipment and/or finding the root concern of recurring high severities found during basic coolant testing. Trending results from IC will provide more information on the fluid and find possible mechanical concerns in the cooling system. Catching system concerns early will help keep the cooling system functioning correctly and reduce unscheduled down times increasing your return of investment.

Check out our Technical Bulletin to find out more information on how Ion Chromatography (IC) Testing works:

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Published August 26, 2020

What To Do if You Have a Coolant Leak

So, you’ve received your oil analysis report back recommending an inspection of the cooling system. (You may or may not also find an oily sheen in the cooling system.) When a lubricant report is received indicating coolant contamination, the root cause of the problem must be found and corrected.

Are you only looking at half of the data?

An internal leak will require further maintenance to be performed to correct the internal contamination, such as a possible new engine rebuild. Have you determined the root cause for the internal leak? Internal leaks are not just something that will be expected to occur at some point in your equipment life expectancy. The same could be said for concerns with your lubricant analysis report indicating higher oxidation values and not being able to optimize the lubricant drain interval. Identifying and reacting to the lubricant analysis recommendations may not always identify the root cause when only testing the oil.

Why would an internal leak or shorter drain intervals occur?

One possible reason is from overheating. Overheating will put more stress on both the lubricant and the coolant and increase acid build up to occur, causing corrosion to the metal surfaces of the engine eventually leading to soft spots. The overheating may not be found on your dashboard but the internal temperatures in the engine may still be elevated. The higher temperatures will cause stress to the lubricant resulting in oxidation and acid build up which ends up thickening the oil. At this point the oil cannot provide the adequate lubricant regime necessary to help protect the engine from wear. Having metal to metal contact will not only increase the engines internal operating temperature, it will also cause soft spots to occur causing cracks and coolant to leak into the engine. As a result this can lead to engine failures, unexpected downtime, maintenance and repair costs.

Are you regularly testing the cooling system within your equipment?

OEMs have indicated approximately 40%, if not higher, of preventable premature engine failures can be traced back to problems in the cooling system. Concerns in the cooling system may be present without a visible indicator and cooling system failures are less common. This is one reason some may not think to test their coolant. However, understanding how the cooling system functions and how the fluid properties can impact the cooling system is a critical component to the overall engine performance.

The purpose of your cooling system is to:

  1. Circulate the coolant throughout the system
  2. Remove heat from the engine
  3. Dissipate heat from the coolant

The cooling system concerns that are not corrected early will hinder the performance of the engine and eventually lead to a premature engine failure. Adding coolant testing to your fluid analysis program will help aid in catching coolant related issues and/or determine if concerns are present due to out of date maintenance procedures. Routine testing of the cooling system will provide recommendations and correction needed to maintain the cooling system and fluid properties. If concerns are not corrected or monitored then internal leaks and/or shorten lubricant drains may occur causing increased wear and damage to your equipment.

Test all fluids in your equipment

Testing all fluids within the equipment by utilizing an effective fluid analysis program will help reduce unexpected down times and/or equipment replacements – resulting in an increase return of investment (ROI). Reach out today to discuss how improve your overall fluid analysis program by testing all components in your equipment.

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Published July 21, 2020

Appearance May Not Tell the Whole Story

 

Appearances can be deceiving! During every PM you need to be monitoring your cooling system.

Your coolant should be clear of precipitate and have the appearance of new fluid when first put into the system. However, only monitoring the appearance may not tell the whole story of the health of the cooling system. Appearance can indicate some concerns when an odor or clarity change occur. However, with further testing performed at regular PM intervals, in conjunction with laboratory testing to monitor the health of the cooling system, concerns can be caught earlier rather than just monitoring the appearance.

Some early system concerns that will not be visible by just looking at your coolant:

  • Corrosion
  • Hard water contamination
  • Chemical reaction impacting pH levels
  • Inhibitor levels
  • Degradation due to overheating
  • Glycol concentration for adequate freeze point and boil point control

One of these coolant samples caused a $500,000 replacement on the equipment. Can you tell which one?

Utilizing proper testing to monitor the cooling system and fluid health are very important for maintaining your equipment.

The cooling system is critical to maintaining proper temperature for the equipment. Approximately 40 to 50 percent of preventable engine failures can be traced back to problems in the cooling system. Of those failures due to the cooling system, 80 percent of the concerns can be identified and corrected early before attributing to engine concerns leading to an unnecessary failure. Proper testing will detect problems that are not visible to the naked eye and determine if the cooling system is able to protect your equipment and prevent unexpected equipment down time and increase maintenance costs.

Learn more about the importance of field testing coolants at every PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Published March 11, 2020

Why Too Much Coolant Corrosion Inhibitor Can Be Harmful

What are coolant corrosion inhibitors?

Coolant corrosion inhibitors help decrease the corrosion rate of metals within your equipment and help maintain other coolant properties. The coolant manufacturers will determine the type of coolant corrosion inhibitors utilized in their product. The main types of inhibitors are:

  • Inorganic based (IAT)
  • Organic based (OAT)
  • Azoles

What coolant should I use?

The coolant you use while maintaining your equipment should utilize the same type of inhibitors as the coolant formulation that’s already in your system.

Here are some ways to make sure your fluid is able to properly protect your equipment:

  • Testing with test strips (see technical bulletin below)
  • Using fluid analysis laboratories
  • Following recommendations on how to maintain inhibitor for the specified fluid type

We know low corrosion inhibitors for heavy duty applications leave our equipment vulnerable to corrosion but, why is too much a problem?

Even though heavy duty equipment will require a higher level of inhibitors compared to light duty equipment, a specific range must be maintained for proper protection. Adding too much coolant corrosion inhibitor to the cooling system, no matter what type of inhibitors are utilized in the fluid, will impact other coolant properties. The pH and specific conductance will increase which will lead to corrosion concerns.

Another concern is the coolant’s saturation point. When the saturation point (where no more inhibitor can be absorbed in the coolant) is reached, the inhibitors will drop out and a precipitate will form. The precipitation will cause plugging of the coolant passage ways.

When this occurs the coolant will no longer be able to prevent corrosion of the metals that come in contact with the coolant.

What a coolant corrosion inhibitor drop out means

A major function of the cooling system will be impacted due to the drop out of coolant corrosion inhibitors. This important function is coolant flow. When the coolant cannot effectively circulate through the engine due to precipitation restricting coolant flow we lose our capability for heat transfer. Without proper heat transfer we will experience engine overheating and may cause further engine damage. Both scenarios of too little or too much coolant corrosion inhibitor will negatively impact your equipment and overall decrease your equipment’s reliability. Maintaining the correct coolant corrosion inhibitors in the recommended ranges per coolant manufacturer recommendations will provide the best protection for your equipment.

Below are some technical bulletins with additional information on coolants, coolant test strips and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

Coolant and Cooling System Maintenance

Coolant Test Strips

Benefits from High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)

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Published October 8, 2019

Tips for Pulling a Fluid Sample for Analysis

From oils to coolants, from coolants to grease – we all have our own methods for pulling a sample. But are you truly getting the best representative sample to send for testing? An accurate, representative sample will get you the most reliable sample results, so you can take the correct maintenance action. Want to learn more about best practices for pulling a sample?  See below for some tips:

Oil and Coolant Samples

There are several methods for pulling oil and coolant samples including a vacuum pump, probing valve and a pushbutton method.

  • Tips for using a Vacuum Pump Method
    • Use to pull samples from a dipstick or non-pressurized system
    • Pull a sample when equipment is at or close to normal operating temperature
    • Make sure the tubing is long enough to reach the middle of the reservoir tank
  • Tips for using a KST Series Probing Valve Method
    • Use with valves installed on a pressurized system with a minimum of 4 psi to a maximum of 1000 psi
    • Pull sample when equipment is at or near normal operating temperature
    • Wipe the valve clean with a dry and lint-free cloth
    • Flush at least 3 times into a “waste container” under the valve to purge stagnant oil and debris.
    • Fill the sample bottle bottle approximately 3/4 full
  • Tips for using a KP Pushbutton Sampling Valve Method
    • Use with valves installed on a pressurized line with a minimum of 4 psi to a maximum of 100 psi
    • Pull sample when equipment is at or near normal operating temperature
    • Remove protective valve cap and wipe opening with a dry and lint-free clean cloth
    • Flush at least 3 times into a separate container and then dispose of the waste oil
    • Fill the sample bottle bottle approximately 3/4 full

For full, step-by-step instructions for taking an oil sample or a coolant sample with these methods, view our technical bulletins or view our Fluid Analysis Sampling and Submission video.

Fluid Analysis Sampling and Submission

Grease Samples

There are two methods for collecting grease samples including a standard grease sampler device or a T-Handle.

  • Grease Sampler Method
    • Each kit comes with a plunger, syringe, spatula and grease sampler used collect your sample
    • Collect grease from the component and fill syringe
    • Use the syringe to fill the grease sampler
  • T-Handle Method
    • Use this method to collect a representative sample when a spatula can’t reach the active zone
    • Attach the grease sampler to the T-Handle tool
    • Measure the appropriate depth of the sample by inserting the locking knob into the proper hole
    • Fully insert the grease sampler and T-handle into the component until the tee contacts the housing face

For full, step-by-step instructions for taking a grease sample with a grease sampler or using the T-Handle tool, view our technical bulletins or view our demonstration videos below.

How to Take a Grease Sample with a Grease Sampler

How to Take a Grease Sample with a T-Handle

After collecting your sample, apply the bar code sticker to the sample bottle/container, submit your sample information online and ship the sample in to the laboratory nearest you for processing and testing.

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Published September 17, 2019

Tips for Understanding Coolant Component Types

POLARIS Laboratories® has over 32 component types to select from for samples pulled from the cooling system. This can become overwhelming. Why are there so many options when the sample is pulled from the cooling system? The reason there are so many options is because a coolant component type represents:

  • The type of inhibitor packaged used for cavitation protection
  • The type of glycol
  • If the sample is new, a concentrate or in-service
8 Common Formulations

There are at least eight common formulations to select from. Once the formulation is determined, the base glycol will need to be selected. After the formulation and glycol base are selected, there are three options to select from to determine if the sample is a baseline or in-service. This is why there are so many options when it comes to selecting the appropriate coolant component type.

The antifreeze formulation can be provided by the Coolant Manufacturer. Anyone submitting samples, purchasing and maintaining cooling systems should know the type of antifreeze utilized in their fleet. The antifreeze information will help indicate if the coolant formulation meets OEM specifications. OEMs specifications will help regulate what formulation is compatible with equipment, seals and hoses. New, advanced equipment technologies and a competitive coolant market will also help drive the different combination of coolant inhibitors being utilized. A mixed OEM fleet may require different antifreeze formulations on-site to meet specifications or a single antifreeze formulation may be acceptable for all OEMs in the fleet.

Selecting the Correct Formulation

Selecting an accurate formulation of antifreeze for the equipment is important. If antifreeze information is unknown and submitted to the laboratory for testing, we default to consider it a conventional ethylene glycol. If the test package evaluates all possible inhibitors we test for, we will be able to determine what type of antifreeze formulation may be in the system. The coolant component type will determine how the results are analyzed and what recommendations are applied on the final report.

To help understand component types and learn the steps for how to select the correct coolant component type, view our Technical Bulletin, Selecting Coolant Component Types.

 

 

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Published July 9, 2019

5 Reasons You Need to be Testing Your Coolant

40 to 50 percent of preventable premature engine failures can be traced back to problems in the cooling system

The majority of those failures are due to issues in the cooling system that can be identified early with coolant sampling

The Importance of Adding Coolant Testing into Your Program

Have you lost an engine and wish you could have caught the problem before the point of no return? Or better yet, what if you could determine the root cause all together? Adding coolant testing to your existing program can do exactly that.

Only monitoring the lubricant provides a limited view of a much bigger picture.

Research has found that when physicians take a whole body approach, their patients heal faster, have a higher success rate, and have a more favorable response to a prescribed medication or therapy. In thinking about our equipment, we should take a similar approach. If you are not testing your coolant, you are ignoring half the patient and half the problems.

As engine metallurgy and design have become more advanced and the demand for increased fuel efficiency and emission’s, engine operating temperatures have increased more than 40 degrees Fahrenheit in the last 50 years. This puts a greater emphasis on maintaining the thermal loads placed on the modern cooling systems.

Some common issues that can be detected and addressed with coolant testing include:

1. Identifying incorrect glycol concentration

There are many causes for the glycol concentration to not be at the proper ratio. Some of the common causes include system top offs with water or coolant concentrate, loss of water due to boil off from a defective pressure cap, and/or flush water left in the system. When glycol concentration is not at the proper ratio per OEM specification problems occur including coolant and engine block freezing, seal damage, and/or overheating. This reduces the life of the lubricant and may cause premature engine failure.

2. Are your pH levels out of specification?

Monitoring the coolant pH levels will indicate early concerns within the cooling system. An engine coolant’s acceptable pH level varies depending upon the coolant formulation. Issues that may arise when pH is out of specification include corrosion of iron components and other metals which often results in pitting of engine liners. Also, corrosives will attack the EGR coolers, or any other cooler in the system. The problem is exacerbated when corrosion protection inhibitors drop out of solution which causes plugging and inadequate coolant flow. When coolant cannot properly circulate, heat cannot be removed efficiently from the engine and the lubricant degrades more quickly resulting in shorter drain intervals.

3. Inadequate corrosion protection inhibitors

The purpose of corrosion protection inhibitors are to maintain pH, prevent foaming and prevent internal metal surfaces from corroding. When corrosion exists in the cooling system heat will not be efficiently removed. Additionally, a corrosive environment will attack most solder joints causing holes and leaks in the system. These leaks will in themselves cause secondary issues including internal coolant boiling, contamination, and adverse chemical reactions.

4. Find sources of contamination

There are many possible sources of contamination which cause damage to the cooling system and ultimately the engine. For our purposes, we will focus on the most preventable source: water, which is used to dilute coolant concentrate or top-off the system. Using water that does not meet ASTM and/or OEM manufacturer’s specifications will increase scale formation and corrosion potential within the cooling system. Even ‘clean’ tap water may contain magnesium, calcium, sulfate or chloride in levels that are harmful for the equipment. Scale forms where the greatest amount of heat transfer is needed and acts as an insulator resulting in overheating and engine damage.

If you want to learn more about adding water to your cooling system, check out our video here.

5. Detect early failure

Coolant testing can indicate combustion gas leaks, air leaks, glycol degradation, electrical issues and contaminants. Each issue will cause chemical reactions within the cooling system, resulting in failure. With early detection, scheduled down time for repairs can be made. Correcting the issue will help prevent complete engine failure or unexpected downtime.

Corrosion occurs at a slower rate than engine wear. This is why engine failures occur more frequently but are often traced back to issues within the cooling system. The cooling system must be able to circulate coolant, remove heat from the system and dissipate the heat in order to function correctly. When the cooling system is not able to circulate or remove the heat effectively, we will see reduced life of the lubricant, increased engine wear, and/or issues with system components, which often result in premature engine failure.

Test all fluids in your equipment!

Testing all fluids within the equipment by utilizing an effective fluid analysis program will help reduce unexpected down times and/or equipment replacements – resulting in an increase return of investment (ROI).

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Published April 16, 2019

Cooling System Do’s and Don’ts

40% of engine failures can be attributed to issues within the cooling system. Knowing the do’s and don’ts for maintaining your cooling system will help protect your equipment, increase reliability and avoid failure. Here’s few things to do and a few things not to do.

Do:

  • Use a water that meets specifications
    • This includes water being used for top offs, mixing a concentrate and if you are unable to remove the majority of the flush water.
    • Water that meets specifications will not add contaminates to cooling system and will help maintain fluid properties.
  • Use the same coolant formulation for maintenance adjustments
    • If you are unable to use the same coolant in the cooling system (this is recommended), then select a coolant that has similar corrosion protection inhibitors (this will maintain the inhibitor levels for adequate corrosion protection)
  • Test your engine coolant and observe fluid at every PM
    • Every engine sample should have at least one coolant sample tested by the laboratory to ensure equipment health and fluid properties are adequate
    • Catching issues early will stop further corrosion or potential for corrosion by proactively correcting the issues found before catastrophic failure occurs
  • Ensure the correct coolant testing is included in your test package
    • Testing all inhibitors in the formulation will help determine if the corrosion protection levels are adequate or not
    • Advanced testing will help determine if degradation acids are present, identify mechanical issues and determine if the system was contaminated with sulfate and/or chloride
    • Using the right test package will provide the best recommendations and protection for your equipment

Do not:

  • Use any type of water to mix with antifreeze
    • This includes top offs, diluting a concentration or leaving excessive amounts of flush water in the system
    • Using hard water that does not meet specifications, will cause scaling of the system components resulting in loss of heat transfer abilities of the cooling system
  • Mix different coolant corrosion protection formulations
    • Be aware, if you mix an organic formulation with a conventional formulation, some OEMs or coolant manufacturers will state the coolant now must be treated as a conventional antifreeze
    • Some OEMs and coolant manufacturers may also only recommend to change out the coolant if mixed. It’s important to know what recommendations for mixing are for you equipment
    • Mixing formulations will hinder corrosion protection levels and could cause inhibitor drop out, leaving the system vulnerable for corrosion. Concerns of incompatibility between inhibitors can be concerning for the equipment health, too.
  • Put coolant in and forget about the cooling system
    • The most preventable engine failure is not maintaining the cooling system. The cooling system should circulate, absorb heat and dissipate heat from the engine. If issues within the cooling system hinder the removal of heat from the engine then equipment issues and eventually engine failure will occur
  • Simply choose to just test the cooling system
    • Not understanding the proper testing needed for the coolant formulation may not provide the whole picture of corrosion protection levels, equipment health and contamination that may be present in the cooling system
    • These can lead to premature engine failures if the cooling system is not being properly maintained

These simple do’s and don’ts are some of the ways to maintain your cooling system from premature engine failures. The cooling system is part of the overall health of your equipment and should not be ignored.

If you aren’t sure what coolant testing is best for your equipment, reach out to us for guidance and explanation. We’re here to answer your questions – and help you save your equipment!

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Published  February 19, 2019